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Malanga Recipes  —  Araceae colocasia
   
 

Malanga roots are usually covered with a dark-dull brown or yellowish-brown thick skin.  They tend to be much larger than potatoes and are very hard.  The young leaves can be used as pot herbs.

   
 

 

   
  Malanga Fritters    
 

Cooked malanga, mashed and made into fritters, is very light and has a nice, nutty taste. 

Peel malanga, wash, cut into cubes, boil in water until tender enough to mash.
For each cup mashed malanga add:
¼ tsp. salt                        1 tsp. arrowroot (or cornstarch)
1egg                                 1 tsp. butter or margarine
1 tsp. light brown sugar
very small bit freshly grated nutmeg
          (just a touch or quick grate)

Blend all together. Drop by teaspoonful into deep oil, at very hot heat. Remove when light brown, only a few minutes.  Drain on paper towels.  Serve.

   
         
  Malanga Salad      
 

Malanga
1 or 2 plantains, unpeeled     Watercress or lettuce
2 sliced tomatoes                     1 sliced onion
1 sliced cucumber                   2-3 hard boiled eggs
¼ lb. salted codfish                 oil and vinegar

Wash the malanga, peel and cut into chunks.  Place in a pot of water with salted codfish and unpeeled plantains.  Boil until tender, 25-30 minutes.
Peel the plantains and shred the codfish.  Place on a platter of watercress or lettuce.  Garnish with the rest of ingredients and top with shredded codfish.  Drizzle oil and vinegar.  Serve cold or hot.

   
       
  Boiled Malanga    
 

Wash and peel malanga.  Cut into cubes.  Boil in water until tender.  Drain.  Add salt and pepper and butter.

   
       
  Baked Malanga      
 

Cook and serve the same way as regular potatos.